Discovery Learning

Is an Off-the-Shelf Simulation on Target with Your Needs?

My last blog made the case for simulation being a uniquely effective way to both immerse and engage your learners for maximum adoption and retention. I outlined the types of simulation and discussed how they can be used to:blueline-solutions2

  • apply knowledge, skills and behaviors in context
  • deliver just-in-time, just enough performance support
  • assess needs and pinpoint skill deficiencies

Yet for all of their plusses and performance points, the objections I hear most often are around development time and investment associated with custom simulations. Despite the fact that the time and expense associated with developing these immersive learning designs have shrunk through the use of innovative new technologies, there are still many scenarios where time and cost can be barriers.

Notice I said can be. But contrary to popular belief, they certainly don’t have to be.

Off-the-Shelf Options
Before you dismiss simulation as a viable training solution in your organization, I challenge you to weigh your options with off-the-shelf offerings proven to build enthusiasm and maximize retention across a broad range of competencies.

Blueline Simulations offers a number of off-the-shelf simulation experiences on topics ranging from sales and marketing to leadership development, business acumen to innovation. These time-tested offerings have been the catalyst for learning and development in leading organizations for many years without the costs typically associated with custom development.

We’ve simplified the process of choosing the simulation that aligns with your needs by creating matrices of our offerings across the categories. I invite you to take a look at our sales and marketing, leadership development and business literacy product matrices to help determine whether the magic of these simulations’ discovery and experiential learning methods is what you’re looking for in your organization.

Over the next few weeks, I’ll address three more critical questions to ask yourself to determine whether simulation is right for you. In the meantime, I invite you to contact us to learn more about any of our custom classroom simulations, Blueline Blueprint™ learning visuals or other innovative delivery methods that have been generating notable business results in leading organizations worldwide for more than 14 years.

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Using Simulation to Put Learning in Context

There’s little question that adoption and retention are driven by immersion and engagement. And there’s no better way to both immerse and engage your learners than through simulation.

Simulation is uniquely effective because it creates an opportunity for learners to apply knowledge, skills and behaviors in context. Many simulation designs also are able to deliver just-in-time, just enough performance support at the point of need. And some simulations can even be used as assessment instruments, helping to identify learners with the greatest need and pinpointing specific skill deficiencies.

why-simulations

Types of Simulation

There are essentially two types of simulation: branching/decision-tree and spreadsheet.

Branching/decision-tree simulations can be used to model interactions with people, software and machines. They range from simple hard-coded faux sim designs that give the illusion of choice to robust designs that distribute and repurpose thousands of nodes based on algorithmic rules and probabilities. This type of simulation is very effective at developing a broad range of interpersonal and decision-focused competencies such as sales, service, coaching and problem-solving and can incorporate interactions with relevant software and machines.

Spreadsheet simulations use complex scenario-modeling frameworks to simulate business strategy and marketplace dynamics. They range from simple sim-board designs that require teams of participants to move chips and tally their own results to sophisticated networked designs that mirror the dynamics of a rapidly changing marketplace. This type of simulation is effective at developing competencies such as business acumen, leadership, change management and judgment.

Despite major technological advances that have reduced development cycles and associated costs, custom simulations typically cost more than other learning alternatives. And the higher the fidelity of the simulation and the more integrated with technology, the greater the cost.

As a third option, our signature Blueline BlueprintTM designs borrow elements from branching and spreadsheet simulations to achieve similar levels of engagement and retention at a lower cost. Blueline BlueprintsTM have been proven to build enthusiasm and maximize retention across a broad range of competencies using both discovery and experiential learning methods.

Over the next month, I’ll be addressing four critical questions to ask yourself to determine whether simulation is right for your needs. In the meantime, I invite you to contact us to learn more about any of our custom classroom simulations, Blueline Blueprint™ learning visuals or other innovative delivery methods that have been generating notable business results in leading organizations worldwide for more than 13 years.

“Can We Hold Class Outside?” Taking Your People to the Field for Full Immersion Learning

In our previous blog entry, we looked at Blueline Simulations’ full immersion approach to learning. These are highly coordinated learning events that take your people out of the organization, away from the computer screen, and away from the classroom – and then place them in an unfamiliar environment where they can begin making connections to big ideas that they can take back to their work.

We shared with you one example, in which we took a global biotech sales firm to Disney, Starbucks and Apple to explore engaging customer experiences.

Okay, here’s another example. Recently, we built an Innovation Tour of San Francisco for a global manufacturing firm. These executives were immersed in the alien world of Silicon Valley where they encountered innovation practices at places like Google, Frog Design, Oracle, The Institute for the Future… and even the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art.

Yes, it was jarring and disorienting. And, in the words of that organization’s CEO, “was one of the most meaningful, valuable learning experiences of my career.” (At this very moment, they are rewriting their five-year strategic plan based on the connections they generated on the Innovation Tour.)

We’ve learned some key principles for making these experiences work.

  • Define the target. No big surprise here; Learning experiences must always be designed in the context of well-defined learning objectives. Don’t start with “let’s go to the Magic Kingdom!” Instead, define the pressing business challenge… and then identify the organizations that have something valuable to bring to that conversation.
  • Get lateral. Theorist Edward de Bono describes lateral leaps as a key capability for breakthrough thinking. Lateral thoughts happen when we connect one idea to another that was seemingly unrelated. When we build immersive experiences, we do identify organizations that are very similar to our clients. Equally important, we identify others that are dissimilar, and can create a productively disorienting lateral leap. That’s how a group of manufacturers found themselves exploring abstract paintings at the San Francisco Museum of Art, and how pharmaceutical executives found themselves in line at an Apple Genius bar to engage customer service around issues with their iPods.
  • A little showmanship doesn’t hurt. The mind is never as engaged as it is at play. That’s why we are purposeful about building in a “cool” factor to our immersive learning experiences. Wouldn’t you just love to visit Google, or hang out at Disney’s EPCOT for a day in the name of learning? Of course you would. So would your people. And the high engagement delivered by these experiences translates to lasting, “sticky” learning.
  • Connect it back. There are critical conversations that must happen for the immersive experience to produce change in the organization. So, what, exactly, did that afternoon at Starbucks say to you? What did you notice, see, hear, smell, experience… and what are the principles behind those experiences that can deliver value at our (very different) organization? In our experience, these facilitated connections conversations are the genesis of true organizational transformation.

Ready to give your employees a peek at a world of possibility far different from your own? Call the learning experts at Blueline Simulations. We’ll build a transformative, immersive learning experience that delivers on your unique learning objectives – all while ensuring that your people will never view their world in quite the same way again.

What’s Next after Experiential Learning? Welcome to Full Immersion.

Here’s how it usually plays out: Client X comes to us with a PowerPoint deck of 300 bazillion, text-dense slides and says, “this is our old training program. Can you do something with this?”

If you’ve clicked around this website at all, you know the answer is yes, we certainly can.

Through simulation, narrative, game mechanics, and more, we transform content from our client partners into a rich experiential learning event that is informed by the latest research in adult learning theory. The applications are nearly endless. And we’ve spent our careers creating some groundbreaking, experiential programs for our clients – in the classroom, and virtually.

But there’s another level that we offer; a fully immersive approach in which your learners step away from the training room or computer, swing open the doors, and step outside into the sunlight and a broader world that is dense with learning opportunity.

Last year, we sent the sales staff of one of the world’s most influential biotech firms to Disney World. Our guess is that a few of them squeezed in a ride on Space Mountain, but that’s fine with us because the purpose was to observe, capture, and reflect upon the ways Disney is able to deliver its legendary, exceptional customer experiences.

We’re talking about a whole-body, fully kinesthetic learning in which learners are plunged into a world that is dissimilar from their own… all for the purpose of unearthing big ideas that can transform their own businesses.

(We even sent those same biotech leaders to Starbucks and Apple stores to explore different varieties of customer experiences. The insights they brought back to their own business were revolutionary.)

In our next blog entry, we’ll take a closer look at these “full immersion” learning events, and draw out some principles that will allow you to begin considering your own.

An Evolution in Learning: Welcome to the Age of Integration Part 1

Our story begins with a classroom and an overhead transparency projector.

In its nascent years, corporate training was filled with the promise of alignment and change as employees were removed from the shop floor, herded into the conference room, and encouraged to scribble notes while a subject matter expert delivered information that had been deemed strategically important. Learning was largely transactional — a one-way transfer of information with learners situated permanently on the receiving end. (As for PowerPoint gosh, don’t get me started. Let’s just say the technology has only ensured that the transactional model stayed in place long past its expiration date.)

Then came the age of the knowledge worker, and organizational learning took on a different flavor. Awakened from their classroom-induced hypnosis, practitioners recalled how they learned to ride their bikes at the age of 8 (no PowerPoints!) and wondered why the same idea couldn’t be brought to the front lines of work. Many firms (including your friends here at Blueline Simulations) were intrigued by the possibility of the “discovery rich learning environment.” Using learning technologies such as immersive simulation, learning visuals, Socratic dialogue, and narrative, learners drew from their own experience and knowledge to generate awareness, insight and behavior change. This rich age of constructivist learning persists today, and firms such as Blueline Simulations continue to explore whole-brained technologies (such as our popular Learning Blueprints) to create engagement, connection, and meaning. The constructivist age of corporate learning is still young, and we’ve just barely scratched the surface.

Then, with a mouse click heard round the world, web-enabled technologies emerged and learning changed yet again. Why are we spending all of this money to fly everyone here to HQ? Just look how much it is costing us to take our people off of the shop floor!

Sure, the early promise of e-learning was accompanied by a certain amount of disillusionment. (Click: Answer the question. Click: Advance to the next screen. Repeat.) But just as classroom designs evolved from transactional to constructivist, so did elearning.

And as the learning industry generated more and more great ideas for exercising the technology well, some new awarenesses began to spread within the organization: that perhaps it was time to end the artificial separation between doing the work and learning how to do the work; and that learning can and should be delivered at the exact moment of need.

The constructivist era has evolved into the age of integrated learning. This has spawned a broad range of performance support innovations.

In my next post I’ll look at some new ideas for delivering integrated learning — mission-critical training at the point of greatest learning impact: at the moment of need.