employee performance

Trust in the Marketplace

Isn’t it interesting?

The American Society for Training and Development’s (ASTD) International Conference was packed with sessions on virtual learning, social media, 3D, best practices for webinars and so on. I attended the conference, and while there, I received a press release about Ken Blanchard’s acquisition of the Trustworks Group. Yes, I did receive it on my iphone, and I admit, I read it while listening to the speaker. Seems this is typical behavior for certain generations.

Well, that definitely peeked my interest given that I have been working with Stephen M.R. Covey for the past three years to bring engaging and dynamic learning programs to the market based on his best-selling book, The Speed of Trust.

Obviously, other thought leaders besides Stephen M.R. are catching on to the idea that trust is a key leadership competency, and that there is a great need to develop leaders who inspire trust.

This is certainly no surprise given that in the past decade, both business and government have violated stakeholder trust and demonstrated how its loss erodes reputation. As a result, trust has emerged as a new line of business.

The 2010 Edelman Trust Barometer suggests that, to advance reputation, companies need to be everywhere, engaging everyone. That they must build a “mosaic of trust.” In fact, the barometer shows that trust and transparency are as important to corporate reputation as the quality of products and services.

High trust organizations out perform low-trust organizations. Total return to shareholders is almost three times higher than the return in low trust organizations. So we assert that trust is clearly a key competency. A competency or skill that can be learned, taught, and improved, and one talent to screen for.

Leaders need to be transparent and talk straight, instead of creating illusions, having hidden agendas, making things seem different from reality, or spinning the truth. These are two of the key behaviors in Stephen M.R. Covey’s book that came out of his work on trust.

We are glad to hear more buzz about trust in the marketplace. And we hope your trust work is based on trust as an economic driver, and about implementing the behaviors of trust at all levels in your organization – getting people to speak the language of trust and understand how to extend, restore and build it.

There are no trust falls or funny hats in our Speed of Trust simulation and Speed of Trust Meeting in a Box. These dynamic learning solutions are about trust as an economic driver; about making trust your operating system; about learning and applying the behaviors common to high trust. Now there is something to tweet about (or we’ll send a press release if you prefer)!

Learning Leaders are the Key to Reengaging a Disengaged Workforce

Your organization has much to contend with – uncertainty in the marketplace, changing customer behaviors, new technology, and employees that have disengaged.  That’s right – DISENGAGED.  The broad employee population may be thankful to have a job, but let’s face it, their focus has been challenged by the worst recession in three generations. In fact, research consistently shows that when employees are uncertain about the organization’s future, their productivity suffers. A lot of time and energy is lost as people discuss and worry about “what could happen.”

Active learning techniques such as simulations or learning visuals have been proven to engage more effectively than any other training medium. Now may be the time to refocus and reengage your workforce with one of these custom training solutions. Imagine the competitive advantage you could enjoy if all of your employees were focused on the critical success factors that your leadership has identified as the keys to achieving plan this year.

Many of our clients have enjoyed tremendous productivity boosts by utilizing our learning visuals (Blueline Blueprints) to facilitate their employee’s personal connection to the business imperative – why it matters, why it must happen now, the role that each of them must play, and the benefits to them collectively and individually.

In one of my favorite movie scenes of all time, Andrew Shephard (played by Michael Douglas), in The American President, chastises Bob Rumsfeld (played by Richard Dreyfuss), saying: “we have serious problems and we need serious people Bob, and your 15 minutes of fame is up.”  Given the current economic conditions, the role of the learning leader as business advocate is more critical than ever.  In the words of Andrew Shephard, “It’s time to stand up and support the business, the time for nice to haves is over.” If you are ready to lead, a custom simulation or learning visual may very well be the answer.